Business bites: Ethics and affiliate marketing

When I set up this blog one of the things I was interested in learning about was if it was really possible to earn a living by being ‘online’. I’ve been exploring how to do that and have read one or two (badly written) books about earning ‘passive income’ that didn’t really help me that much. I’m not going to name names, but I felt that had probably been written at speed, possibly as an attempt to create a passive income product in themselves, and lacked practical detail.  Both had an underlying passive aggressive tone that suggested that anyone who wasn’t trying to set up their own online empire was basically an idiot. This is of course rubbish. There are many splendid and enjoyable ways of making a living that don’t involve owning a website.

In the last 2 weeks I’ve been looking at the idea of affiliate marketing and found a bit more concrete information. The idea is that you can sign up for an account with programme like Amazon associates  and they will then pay you a small commission every time they sell something through a recommendation you make on a blog or other social media platform. For Amazon affiliates the process is that you open an account that will allow you to search for products that you have used. It will then generate a link for each product that you select. The link has a special bit of computer code in it that will connect to you and your account. You can then use this link in your blog posts – if anyone clicks through from your blog and goes on to buy the product you get a little kick back.

The psychological principle behind this is a simple one. People are more likely to buy something when someone they know and trust has already tried it, liked it and recommended it. I studied the principles of persuasion through my PhD and I think the evidence then (8 years ago now) was pretty strong in suggesting that personal recommendations will be far more successful in selling a product than advertising alone. So the psychology behind this is pretty straight forward, however it does leave the affiliate with an ethical problem. The more things you link to, the more your earning potential increases. This in itself isn’t ethically problematic, but it leads to the temptation to link to just anything you happen to see while browsing. Given that the principle is based around trusted recommendations, it’s a breach of that trust to link to things that you’ve not tried, or that you don’t like or didn’t find helpful. So I think it is possible to be an ethical affiliate, and but it takes a little thought about what you are linking to.

I opened an account last week (it was very simple to do this – I’ve linked the site above). I’m going to be using affiliate links in the blog to see whether in reality you can make much money this way. My blog currently generates very little traffic so I’m not setting high hopes for this experiment, but will update you if I turn out to have been wrong on that. My ethical line on this is that I’m only going to link to products or books that I have used or read myself AND have found helpful.

 

About The Magpie at Midnight

Social scientist, writer, film maker, collagist, maker of things...
This entry was posted in Online buisness, Passive income, Small business, starting a business and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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